I used to doodle these gryphon dogs when I was in middle school.  Brought them back except with more hound influence.

I used to doodle these gryphon dogs when I was in middle school. Brought them back except with more hound influence.

Archimedes likes bubbles

So I made a whole series of adorable non edible baked Christmas ornaments either last year or the year before. (these were the only photos I could find… I had sphynxes and other doggies, too!)

The pugs were for my close animator buddy, and the cats were my mom’s cats.  Anyway, I’m thinking that I might pick this up again and offer up some personalized pet ornaments x3  I’ll have to experiment a bit, but I should work out the kinks by November.

Anyway, just wanted to share some cuties.  I’ve found a ton of photos of art i never posted while going through my images folders.

Kikidoodles Volume II is being designed as we speak!
It’ll be a 60 page, perfect bound softcover, full color book complete with sketches, doodles, WIPs, full and 3/4 spreads and a lot of unseen goodies!
I’ll be throwing it out to the printer by tomorrow, and hopfully the first books will be available for APE… otherwise they’ll be available for online order starting mid October.
YAY!

I took an old artwork and edited the layers and painted 50% more background to use as a cover.  So here’s your preview of the cover and a sneak peak of the first 2 pages. (And everything is subject to change until I pay the huge printing cost of course :p)

zoosemiotics said: Sometimes I wonder what I’m going to do with all my old art that I am not always going to have room for… perhaps free art signs and leave it around town X)

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A lot of my stuff was from school, like PILES of newsprint. I had had a moment where I realized that if I didn’t learn how to get rid of my excess stuff that I would wind up on hoarders, except it would be between me and newsprint. (Plus, with digital cameras, we can document EVERYTHING, so I didn’t NEED the old work.)

So I was in the middle of jumping to crush it inside of the large trash can when my roommate’s buddies came by and just STARED at me (note that there is art strewn all over the ground) and I was just like “I MUST GET RID OF MY ART!”

They haven’t ever come back.  I think they figured I was a crazy artist who had lost it.

kikidoodle:

During my first job, we were given $100 to decorate our desks, and mine was a fish theme.  I found the old photo of the paper cut out, taken after I left for Disney Interactive, and shortly before I had to throw this out (sadly)  You can see my feet down there for size comparison.  I literally had nowhere to put it, and no way to ship it if someone wanted it!! (and it was a little bent up, and things like the dogfish’s fins had fallen off from 5 months of work)

Unfortunately my photos aren’t very quality, either.  oops.
This was my first ever paper cut out.

calicougar said: Threw it out?!? What a shame. It’s neato! Is the cat a sculpin? Awesome.

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Tumblr needs a way to respond to responses.
Yeah, total shame, but it was a casualty of my great reduction in art, where I threw out about 80% of the art I had collected since I was a student (after taking photos).  I literally couldn’t get into the laundry room anymore.

Anyway, the cat is a Calico Catfish :p  It’s just a mix of my feral rescue cat Pandora x a catfish, and the dog is based off of a Westie that my boss owned.

During my first job, we were given $100 to decorate our desks, and mine was a fish theme.  I found the old photo of the paper cut out, taken after I left for Disney Interactive, and shortly before I had to throw this out (sadly)  You can see my feet down there for size comparison.  I literally had nowhere to put it, and no way to ship it if someone wanted it!! (and it was a little bent up, and things like the dogfish’s fins had fallen off from 5 months of work)

Unfortunately my photos aren’t very quality, either.  oops.
This was my first ever paper cut out.

I got to work on a cinematic for a cute game about penguins taking over the world called Penguemic by LearnDistrict. http://learndistrict.com/penguemic.html

The style was rather simple, but they let me throw in some of my own flair as this was for a cinematic.  Here’s my two favorite panels.  The ice is shrinking, and the shadows of huge bears descend upon the hapless penguin village.
Too much fun!!

A highly detailed critique that both expresses where I went wrong, how to improve, and what you like about the piece!?  I SWOON!

Riki Tiki Tavi.
Going to experiment tomorrow after I finish some commission work :)

Inspired by an amazing frame I found at the thrift store today!!

Riki Tiki Tavi.
Going to experiment tomorrow after I finish some commission work :)

Inspired by an amazing frame I found at the thrift store today!!

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for artists who want to get themselves better known but have no idea where to start?

fenrislorsrai:

kikidoodle:

Hi!  Sorry it took so long to answer this, but I didn’t realize my inbox was FULL of messages as Tumblr was emailing my junk email whenever an ask was sent.  There are thousands of ways to get noticed, so here are just a FEW tips that I can think of at 2 in the morning.

OK, so first of all, POST ART!  It sounds silly, but very frequently artists will only post a doodle here, or a doodle there, and remain inactive for long periods of time, because they worry that they’re not yet good enough.  We’re all constantly growing as artists, so it’s acceptable if everything isn’t perfect.  And the thing is, that even a few imperfect pieces will help a casual viewer start to remember you and what you bring.  Also, with each new piece of artwork submitted, you have another chance to catch some new viewers.  Casual fans may become more active if you post frequently with art, or advice, or information.

Secondly, whether it’s on Deviantart, Tumblr, or anywhere else, properly tag your artwork!  Tagging artwork creates yet another venue for people who have never seen your stuff before to find it!  And think of some tags that might be a little odd, but still define you.  It’s not just “pokemon” but “pokemon art”  more specific tags will have less views, but you’re also less likely to get lost in a deluge of other posts.

Become active in a community.  Whether it’s a community you create, or a community you’re already a part of, if you become more active, people will be likely to come visit your page just by merit if you being there.  As the community grows, your visibility can grow, too!  For example, Sketch Dailies on Twitter was just a small group, but exploded overnight!  Now just by merit of them reposting occasional artwork, I have found a ton of new artists I otherwise never would have heard of.

Put your art EVERYWHERE!  You never know where someone can find you!  Put your art on Deviantart, Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram, etcetcetc.  Some times people will follow you across multiple platforms, but often I find that people have 1-2 platforms they primarily use to view artwork, and if an artist isn’t a part of those platforms, they really won’t actively follow their work.  Even if you don’t post much, just having your art on a platform can be good.  I got my children’s book illustration gig from some scattered art that had been posted to Instagram that I had totally forgotten.  Since then, I’ve been more active in posting.

Go to conventions and network!!  This is less of a “How to get fans online” and more of a “How to get noticed by people who can PAY YOU for your art!”  Look up local conventions and go to them and talk to all of the artists there.  Often, they can give you advice, or even possibly will ask you to go to a sketch crawl with them.  By following artists you meet locally you can start to see into their network, and befriend other people, too.  The art world is rather small, and everyone eventually knows everyone, which is actually kind of nice!  If you’re friendly and open, you can meet a ton of people.  If you feel confident with your artwork, sell at a convention!  Even if you don’t make a ton (or any) money at first, you can meet very valuable contacts and make business deals!  I’ve gotten multiple job offers even from conventions I never would have thought that possible.  I met Laila from Girls Make Games (learndistrict.com) at Fanime, met the guy I’m doing a children’s book for through Wondercon as well as met several publishers there, and just met another possible job lead through SF ZineFest.  A friend of mine had her comic picked up by Cartoon Network through APE!  These conventions give you tons of opportunities to meet professional people, get advice, and also show your best face for potential work!  It often takes 2-3 years to get comfortable enough showing your artwork at conventions to make an impact on strangers, so it’s best to start early, and make your mistakes then before it’s as big of a deal.

Talk to everyone.  Artists are generally pretty friendly and open about helping people and answering questions.  There are the occasional sour pusses out there, but for the most part, we all started off somewhere, and are willing to go out of our way to help people.
A few recommendations, though:  When approaching an artist to ask a question, research your own question first.  If your question can easily be answered by a google search, you need to think of more specific, or JUICY questions to get better and more useful answers.  If you ask a pointed and interesting enough question, you never know what you might learn.

Good luck!

~Kiki

also: submit stuff to local real world fine art shows!  Your local arts council often has a mailing list or website with all the upcoming shows that are looking for art.  Might be for the city, might be county, might be whole state depending on where you live.

Even if you don’t get in to THAT show, jurors may well send you opportunities for different shows OR introduce you to someone else they think will like your work. word of mouth is very powerful.

I did about a year of group shows where I had one piece semi-consistently, did a mini solo show, did an open studio event end of last year, and then this year I had a month long show with two other artists that I was introduced to through the open studio day, and then just hung a solo show last week that’ll be up for two months. which is all monsters. 

and I have another solo show going up at City Hall for two months to finish out year. (in city of about 82K people) and that solo show is basically one big Sharktopus party. seriously, they booked the show for two months, JUST ME, based entirely on shark monsters fighting squid and other sea monsters. That was what I had lying around as “recent work” that fit the specs when they did the call for submissions. 

Just because you don’t feel like you aren’t doing “fine art” does not mean you won’t get into those spaces.  Read the prospectus and send stuff in.  They tend to see stuff from the same few people over and over and if you’re doing something DIFFERENT that works both for and against you.  For a large group show, they may not add you because you don’t fit.  (say if everything else submitted was landscapes they’re probably not going to put in your portrait)  But it also works FOR you as even if it didn’t fit THIS show, they often will send you a prospectus for a different show they think fits and they want fresh blood in it.  Regional groups are more likely to send you a follow up because they tend to be filling much more diverse spaces than a specific gallery is.  

TLDR: don’t assume fine art spaces are closed to you. respond to their calls for submission! yes, even with the cray-cray stuff. I had three headed werewolf graphically disemboweling and devouring a sheep on display for two months at one point. 

(for those interested in the crazy ass solo shows, there’s info on Anomalous Animals of the Americas and What Lies Beneath (aka Sharktopus) over at my just art tumblr hconeillart  they’re in southwestern CT, accessible on the NYC train line)

A great reply, so I wanted to post it :)!

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for artists who want to get themselves better known but have no idea where to start?

Hi!  Sorry it took so long to answer this, but I didn’t realize my inbox was FULL of messages as Tumblr was emailing my junk email whenever an ask was sent.  There are thousands of ways to get noticed, so here are just a FEW tips that I can think of at 2 in the morning.

OK, so first of all, POST ART!  It sounds silly, but very frequently artists will only post a doodle here, or a doodle there, and remain inactive for long periods of time, because they worry that they’re not yet good enough.  We’re all constantly growing as artists, so it’s acceptable if everything isn’t perfect.  And the thing is, that even a few imperfect pieces will help a casual viewer start to remember you and what you bring.  Also, with each new piece of artwork submitted, you have another chance to catch some new viewers.  Casual fans may become more active if you post frequently with art, or advice, or information.

Secondly, whether it’s on Deviantart, Tumblr, or anywhere else, properly tag your artwork!  Tagging artwork creates yet another venue for people who have never seen your stuff before to find it!  And think of some tags that might be a little odd, but still define you.  It’s not just “pokemon” but “pokemon art”  more specific tags will have less views, but you’re also less likely to get lost in a deluge of other posts.

Become active in a community.  Whether it’s a community you create, or a community you’re already a part of, if you become more active, people will be likely to come visit your page just by merit if you being there.  As the community grows, your visibility can grow, too!  For example, Sketch Dailies on Twitter was just a small group, but exploded overnight!  Now just by merit of them reposting occasional artwork, I have found a ton of new artists I otherwise never would have heard of.

Put your art EVERYWHERE!  You never know where someone can find you!  Put your art on Deviantart, Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram, etcetcetc.  Some times people will follow you across multiple platforms, but often I find that people have 1-2 platforms they primarily use to view artwork, and if an artist isn’t a part of those platforms, they really won’t actively follow their work.  Even if you don’t post much, just having your art on a platform can be good.  I got my children’s book illustration gig from some scattered art that had been posted to Instagram that I had totally forgotten.  Since then, I’ve been more active in posting.

Go to conventions and network!!  This is less of a “How to get fans online” and more of a “How to get noticed by people who can PAY YOU for your art!”  Look up local conventions and go to them and talk to all of the artists there.  Often, they can give you advice, or even possibly will ask you to go to a sketch crawl with them.  By following artists you meet locally you can start to see into their network, and befriend other people, too.  The art world is rather small, and everyone eventually knows everyone, which is actually kind of nice!  If you’re friendly and open, you can meet a ton of people.  If you feel confident with your artwork, sell at a convention!  Even if you don’t make a ton (or any) money at first, you can meet very valuable contacts and make business deals!  I’ve gotten multiple job offers even from conventions I never would have thought that possible.  I met Laila from Girls Make Games (learndistrict.com) at Fanime, met the guy I’m doing a children’s book for through Wondercon as well as met several publishers there, and just met another possible job lead through SF ZineFest.  A friend of mine had her comic picked up by Cartoon Network through APE!  These conventions give you tons of opportunities to meet professional people, get advice, and also show your best face for potential work!  It often takes 2-3 years to get comfortable enough showing your artwork at conventions to make an impact on strangers, so it’s best to start early, and make your mistakes then before it’s as big of a deal.

Talk to everyone.  Artists are generally pretty friendly and open about helping people and answering questions.  There are the occasional sour pusses out there, but for the most part, we all started off somewhere, and are willing to go out of our way to help people.
A few recommendations, though:  When approaching an artist to ask a question, research your own question first.  If your question can easily be answered by a google search, you need to think of more specific, or JUICY questions to get better and more useful answers.  If you ask a pointed and interesting enough question, you never know what you might learn.

Good luck!

~Kiki

Anonymous asked:

where did you attend school?

I attended school at Academy of Art University in San Francisco.
I graduated in 2010 with a Bachelors of Fine Arts, and I’m actually going to be teaching a course there this semester!  Digital Illustration 2: Illustrative Imaging.

Feel free to email me if you have any specific questions about art school, or want to know other alternatives (Because yes, I know it’s expensive)
christineknopp@gmail.com